Stacey Dooley’s new make-up show Glow Up proves a hit with viewers

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Stacey Dooley’s new make-up show Glow Up has proven to be a hit with viewers (Ian West/PA Wire)

Stacey Dooley’s new make-up show Glow Up has proven to be a hit with viewers after making its debut on BBC Three.

The Strictly Come Dancing winner had earlier defended the programme after critics accused her of doing “trivial” work instead of the gritty documentaries that made her famous.

Dooley said the backlash was “painfully predictable” and accused her detractors of having a “short-sighted, Stone Age attitude”.

Glow Up features 10 aspiring make-up artists (MUAs) fighting to be named Britain’s next cosmetics star and win the chance to work alongside some of the world’s top talent.

Dooley, 31, hosts the show while stylists Val Garland and Dominic Skinner are on judging duties, alongside a different guest judge each week.

After the first episode aired on BBC Three on Wednesday, viewers heaped praise on the show.

One Twitter user said: “Been catching up with episode 1 and im loving it! Im an aspiring MUA, and an experience like this would of been amazing to do! Always love a challenge, makes me miss it from college getting briefs and having to design looks. #GlowUp.”

Another wrote: “Loved #Glowup no way would I cope under that pressure! @StaceyDooley amazing as always!”

A fan said: “Abso loving #GlowUp @StaceyDooley @TheValGarland @dom_MUA are incredible together! Love this!!”

A viewer commented: “I am O B S E S S E D with #GlowUp already! @StaceyDooley!”

And another tweeted: “Just sitting down to watch my girl @StaceyDooley in #GlowUp Love your usual stuff but really enjoying seeing you on some more fun, light hearted vibes.”

Dooley, who triumphed in Strictly Come Dancing, is best known for her hard-hitting documentaries, covering subjects including terrorism, prostitution and child sex abuse.

After making a film in Africa for Comic Relief, she was criticised by Labour MP David Lammy, who accused her of reinforcing unhelpful stereotypes.

He said: “The world does not need any more white saviours.” Dooley replied and invited Mr Lammy to travel to Africa himself.

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