Woman admits stabbing man in Aberdeen street attack

A woman has admitted stabbing a 41-year-old man in an Aberdeen street.

At the High Court in Glasgow today Sarahjane Massie, 36, pled guilty to knifing the man on George Street, to the danger of his life.

Co-accused George Hanratty, 34, admitted assaulting him to his injury by punching and kicking him in the head and body.

Police at an incident on George Street

Prosecutor Angela Gray said injured man was understood to be involved in the supply of drugs and did not wish to be involved in the prosecution.

She said: “The catalyst for this incident is not known.

“Around 8.15pm on February 12 the accused Hanratty and Massie became involved in a physical altercation with (the victim).

“During the course of that, Hanratty punched and kicked him on the head and body.

“Massie then struck him on the body with a knife.”

The court heard that a woman bystander shouted at the group and the assault stopped and the accused ran off.

Police found the victim lying on the pavement bleeding heavily from facial injuries and a puncture wound to his chest.

He had £1,300 in cash in his jacket pocket.

The High Court in Glasgow

Miss Gray added: “A search of the area near to where the assault took place was conducted and police officers found four wraps; one containing heroin and three containing cocaine.”

The 41-year-old was taken to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary and found to be suffering from a tension pneumothorax which causes a punctured lung and the heart to be pushed on to the other side of the body and stops blood flowing normally.

Miss Gray said: “If untreated this condition will lead to death.”


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The accused were identified by eye witnesses and by CCTV footage.

The victim’s blood was also found on Massie’s jeans.

Judge Lord Mulholland deferred sentence until August for background reports and remanded both accused in custody.

Both accused, who are prisoners in HMP Grampian, have previous convictions for violence.

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